China’s One Dog Policy


Following the long-held ‘One Child Policy’ in China which, contrary to certain stereotypes doesn’t apply in Hong Kong and contains multiple loop-holes, Shanghai has now passed a law to introduce a ‘One Dog Policy’, limiting homes to one canine each as it tries to curb the growing popularity of man’s best friend.
This popped up in my news feed a few minutes ago and I found it funny and hilarous more than anything else. I am sure that Shanghai faces a growing Dog population problem, but it is just entertaining how the first and only policy that policy-makers can come up with is yet another one child policy.

Shanghai has adopted a one-dog policy, passing a law limiting homes to one canine each as it tries to curb the growing popularity of man’s best friend.

The law takes effect on May 15, the official China Daily said yesterday.

Under the law, dog owners must also give their pets’ puppies to eligible households or to government-approved adoption agencies before they reach the age of three months, the report said.

Anyone who now owns two or more licensed dogs will be allowed to keep them, it said.

Dog ownership has grown alongside the fast-expanding middle class with official estimates putting Shanghai’s pet dog population at 800,000 – although only a quarter of that number are registered, a previous report said. The government said tighter rules were needed due to rampant barking, unscooped waste and the growing risk of dog attacks, which affect the city’s environment.

There were about 58 million pet dogs in 20 major cities at the end of 2009 and the figure is rising about 30 per cent each year, according to a survey by Beijing-based magazine Dog Fans.

Pet owners on the mainland spend an estimated US$2 billion a year on their animals, said Per Lyngemark, founder of Shanghai-based Petizens.com, a Facebook-like site dedicated to pets.

Advertisements